radio-microphone

Jason is back for a new season of the FTB Podcast! Panelists Mirna Djukic and Cem Ertekin discuss the Dakota Access Pipeline, the problems happening within the Canadian Green Party with an interview from Quebec Green Leader Alex Tyrrell and our News Roundup segment. Plus the Community Calendar and Predictions!

Host: Jason C. McLean
Producer: Hannah Besseau
Production Assistant: Enzo Sabbagha

Panelists

Mirna Djukic: FTB News Contributor

Cem Ertekin: FTB Managing Editor

 

*Alex Tyrrell interview and Pipeline Report by Hannah Besseau

Microphone image: Ernest Duffoo / Flickr Creative Commons

the-tragically-hip-2

For this very special podcast our host Jason talks with panelist Ron Roxtar about the last Tragically Hip concert, it’s political implications and the Monkland Street Fest. Plus the Community Calendar and Predictions!

Host: Jason C. McLean
Producer: Hannah Besseau
Production Assistant: Enzo Sabbagha

Panelists

 

Ron Roxtar: Pop Culture Aficionado , Journalist and Promoter

 

*Reports by Hannah Besseau

Band image: Radio Canada 

heavy montreal

This week is very yellow line centered as two festivals hit Île Sainte-Hélène at the same time, I tell you the coolest (or maybe it’s the most random) thing you could do tonight and we actually mention a local band (Les Breastfeeders) amidst this sea of summer festivals.

Heavy Montreal

For anyone into the metal/hard rock scene the angry little brother of our city’s festival season Heavy Montreal takes over Parc Jean Drapeau for it’s ninth’s edition this Saturday and Sunday. Around since 2008, this fest has steadily grown in popularity and has even seen a re-branding from it’s earlier incarnation Heavy Mtl (or heavy metal!!!!) in order to hopefully gain some crossover appeal and attract fans from a wider variety of musical tastes.

A little piece of advice for the organizers: you can change the name of the fest all you want but when you book bands like Five Finger Death Punch, Disturbed, Nightwish, Killswitch Engage, Napalm Death and Hatebreed to play then who are you kidding, it’s a bloody metal show! I guess their idea of diversity is a couple of headliners that are more hard rock than metal.

For those who don’t want to leave the island or pay the rather ummmm heavy ticket prices there’s also a Heavy in the City aspect to the fest with a bunch of smaller shows and after parties you can attend for a fraction of the cost. For example on Sunday you can head down to L’Astral and check out Cult of Luna as part of the official after party.

The most interesting off site activity by far is taking place Thursday night at Concordia University where organizers Grimposium are hosting a screening of the new film Death by Metal followed by a bilingual panel discussion with members of the industry as well as the director Felipe Belalcazar.

This will be followed by the coolest thing you could possibly do tonight, a workshop on how to sing death metal vocals. That and the fact the event is totally free makes this my hands down top pick of the week!

Heavy Montreal plays Plaine Des Jeux at Parc Jean Drapeau, Saturday and Sunday, August 6th and 7th, tickets $149.50 or 275 through Heavy Montreal.

Cult of Luna play L’Astral, 305 Rue Saint-Cahterine Ouest, Sunday, August 7th, 11:45pm (Doors at 10:45pm), tickets $21.50 through Heavy Montreal.

Grimposium presents Death by Metal at Concordia University, VA114 Cinéma, 1395 René-Lévesque Ouest, Thursday August 4th, 7pm, free ($5 suggested donation)

ÎleSoniq

Also taking place at Parc Jean Drapeau this Friday and Saturday will be one of our newer and more musically specific festivals, ÎleSoniq, which basically turns part of Île Sainte-Hélène into a big outdoor rave. This event is also expansive in it’s secondary options available to people who want to stay on the island of Montreal in the form of a series of afterparties.

ÎleSoniq plays Parterre du Parc Jean Drapeau, Friday and Saturday, August 5th and 6th, tickets $95 to $250 available through ÎleSoniq boxoffice.

Yellow Line Fashion Show

For those paying attention to the dates you’ll notice that on Saturday afternoon there will be an overlap of people heading to Île Sainte-Hélène for both ÎleSoniq and Heavy Montreal. The festivals are obviously separate but anyone taking the yellow line will be treated to quite a display of strikingly different fashion senses.

Les Breastfeeders + OL’ CD + Hobo Lord

For those who want a straight up kick ass rock show I suggest you head down to L’Escogriffe on Saturday where Montreal’s own Les Breastfeeders will be playing with the support of two Toronto acts OL’ CD and Hobo Lord. Take a little pinch of punk, a dash of surf, mix it with a three and a half minute garage rock song and you’ve got the recipe for the evening.

In festival season we sometimes get locked into trying to see the biggest and best international acts around. There’s nothing wrong with that but it’s important to remember there are some seriously talented local acts ready to give you their all… and for a much more affordable price.

 Les Breastfeeders, OL’ CD and Hobo Lord play L’Escogriffe, 4467 Saint-Denis, Saturday, August 6th, tickets $10.

* Featured image from Heavy Montreal 2013 by Chris Zacchia

Know a band or an artist that should be featured in Shows This Week? Maybe a show FTB should cover, too? Let us know at music@forgetthebox.net. We can’t be everywhere and can’t write about everything, but we do our best!

Fredua Boakye

“Growing up, people were always telling me that I was the ‘whitest Black kid’ they knew because I loved ‘white rock music’ like Radiohead and Dead Kennedys,” says Fredua of Bad Rabbits. He laughs, and quickly responds to them: “But you can’t ‘act a colour,’ and Rock & Roll culture isn’t reserved for X race. But I will say this until my dying day: Rock & Roll was created by a Black Queer woman named Rosetta Tharpe.”

Fredua is the frontman of Bad Rabbits, and I had the honour to speak with him about race, rock, and his thoughts on being a Black American in 2016.

Fredua tells me that conversations of race and belonging within his scene have always been a part of his consciousness, explaining the common lamentation among young men of colour that he was never “Black enough” for the Black kids, and “too Black” for the white kids.

“I considered myself a hybrid from the jump because nobody on either side liked me… The only kids who accepted me in school were the punk rock kids.” For Fredua, this embrace of the punk scene of the late 80s led to an early and profound appreciation for bands like Bad Brains, Dead Kennedys, and Public Enemy.

The moment of clarity that gave Fredua a real understanding of how he could fit into the Rock scene came when he saw Fishbone and Living Colour music videos, with Black musicians like Kendall Jones and Vernon Reid “not rapping, not singing, just jamming with guitars. When people said I was the ‘whitest Black guy’… There was nothing ‘white’ about what I was doing. Period. I was doing what I saw, and that was a Black person playing this music.”

When I asked Fredua about conversations of race in his current role as the frontman of a multi-ethnic band in a scene dominated by white dudes, he emphatically affirmed that there has never been racial tension at a Bad Rabbits show, as people are too busy having a good time. It’s when he stops making music for people to dance to, and starts talking about things that make him angry and upset – like the ability for police to routinely kill Black people with impunity – that tempers begin to flare.

Fredua explains, “There are probably a bunch of my fans that are inherently racist, and I know this because I’ve argued with them. They’re the types that grew up thinking Black people are supposed to only be entertainers or basketball players. When they see me speaking my mind it’s suddenly ‘Fredua, you’re an entertainer, you shouldn’t be talking like that!’ People are angry at the fact that I have the nerve to talk about things going on instead of making a song for them to dance to.”

In response to the recent spate of highly-publicized killings of Black people by police, Fredua posted a video to his personal Facebook page in support of the #BlackLivesMatter movement.

Fredua tells me that the response from most friends and fans was positive, but one fan came out of the woodwork to leave the following comment: “I follow you because I think your old band was awesome, but let’s be honest, this militant black guy thing isn’t working out for anyone.”

Fredua explains it’s no skin off his nose – people who see him not as a Black human being, but strictly an entertainer aren’t real fans anyway. The reluctance of white peers and fans to see him as anything but a stage presence has bothered Fredua since he first started singing: “I look back at school, and I mean, I did chorus for the girls. Don’t get me wrong,” he says with a laugh, “The girls loved my voice. But they didn’t love me. Because I didn’t look like them.”

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I asked Fredua if these reactions to his showmanship bother him when he looks back on them, and he is quick to point out that he’s one of the lucky ones. “I lived out my dream. That dream was to make music and act like a damn fool for the rest of my natural life, and I don’t have to worry about aging because I found the fountain of youth through music. I have a beautiful house and a beautiful wife and a beautiful dog and I get to do something I love all the time.”

Fredua mentioned that Bad Rabbits has a new album one year in the making that will have more anger in it than previous records. He describes some of the album’s lyrical content as “two year’s worth of anger,” much of it directed toward the issues that we spoke about.

The new album, American Nightmare, is planned to drop in September, but will likely end up coming sooner. When I naively asked if the early release was due to the urgency of the message, Fredua’s voice dropped to that sacred place where the spirit meets the bone:

“This is the thing that kills me about this issue of police brutality,” Fredua says calmly, but with palpable fury. Cops are always gonna kill people. As long as there’s a justice system that lets these people kill someone and go about their day, there is never gonna be any type of change. This country is hell bent on keeping things the way it is – to keep the haves and the have-nots, the white and the Black, the Us and the Them, separate.”

The footage of the recent shootings and lack of legal action against the officers involved has made it abundantly clear to the public that it is possible to kill a Black person with little to no consequence. Black activists like Fredua, understandably furious that their lives are proven to be worth less than white victims of similar violence, are routinely portrayed by mainstream media as “armed-and-dangerous Black Power rebels,” seconds away from violence.

Fredua (Second from left) with Bad Rabbits
Fredua (Second from left) with Bad Rabbits

In an interview with The New Yorker, Black Lives Matter co-founder Alicia Garza explained that this image is “a battle that we are consistently having to fight. Standing up for the rights of black people as human beings and standing against police violence and police brutality makes you get characterized as being anti-police or it has you being characterized as cop killers, neither of which we are.”

Fredua expressed a similar frustration, explaining that “it’s easier for news channels like CNN, MSNBC, and FOX to show footage of angry Black people on TV than it is for them to show smart Black people with an idea. Nobody is listening to the solutions we’re trying to offer. And the picture they put up of the shooter in Dallas? A pissed-off black man with a dashiki and a fist up? That puts a target on my fucking back!”

Despite all of the difficult topics that came up in our conversation, Fredua’s determination to keep performing and thriving as a Black man in America in 2016 shines through. His concluding statement was one of hope:

“I was raised by two West African immigrants that came to this country on an American dream…I’m gonna make sure that I achieve it through them with my voice. That dream was to have a prosperous, peaceful, God-fearing life. I will die for that. I’m not afraid for a shooter coming to my show, I’ll jump in front of any bullet to protect a fan. I’m gonna do what I do until I die. I will literally die for this.”

jadeakelly

At an arrestingly beautiful show last weekend, songstress Jadea Kelly introduced her new album, Love & Lust, at Toronto’s Drake Underground. Jadea’s third studio record is the follow up to Clover (2013), an equally brilliant collection of songs with themes of nature, love and spirituality.

Love & Lust is outright a breakup album, and naturally focuses on the sentiments and circumstances revolving around infidelity, desire, betrayal and forgiveness. The record is brave, vulnerable, passionate and infinitely graceful.

Jadea’s soft and sultry vocals and gentle acoustic guitar are the conduit for some seriously raw sentiments. Backed by some of Toronto’s finest, the intensity of her band helps to heighten the songs, adding layers of colour and mystique in a tasteful and artistic manner without overshadowing Jadea herself.

Not always an easy task for accomplished players, but her longtime guitar player Tom Juhas is a master of this. He’s seriously talented, but never overplays, instead adding just what each song needs.

Jadea_2015_275JenSquiresCROP (2)
Photo by Jen Squires

Mariah is the catalyst for the entire recording and acts as the tempestuous juxtaposition to the album’s most forgiving song, Beauty, co-written by Canadian artist Peter Katz.

Perhaps Love & Lust’s poppies number, Good Girl, was co-penned by another Canadian singer-songwriter, Robyn Dell’Unto.  It’s been receiving regular airplay on CBC and has made it onto their Top 20 this week! Go vote!

Love & Lust has to be one of the most honest, vulnerable and emotional records of 2016. It fleshes out sentiments and circumstances that everyone can relate to in some form.  You can purchase it on iTunes and via Jadea’s website.   She has launched her post-release tour so check out her tour dates!

This record is a huge step forward for Jadea, who is rightfully earning her place among the best singer-songwriters in Canada right now. You will see and hear more of her to come, but don’t wait; she’s too good to wait on and this video proves it.  Southern Souls shot the live video for this haunting and atmospheric second track, On the Water:

Writing this record and the circumstances that led to its inception obviously did a number on Jadea, however the process seems to have been cathartic and healing all at once. It’s impressive that such beauty can come from such sadness.  However she got here, I can’t wait to watch the career of this young and talented songwriter continue to develop and unfold.

nomadic massive

This week we’ll check in with Nomadic Massive who launch their new album tonight, I try to make a segue-way from hip hop to punk rock, Pierre Kwender’s music is compared to soup, I excessively brag about my clearly very average ability to search for things on the internet and much more!

Nomadic Massive Album launch

Tonight you can head down to Groove Nation where Montreal Hip Hop mainstays Nomadic Massive will be hosting and event to release their latest album The Big Band Theory. Around since 2004, the multiethnic – multilingual supergroup has been touring and performing with the best of them for the past three years but tonight they’re back home to give the local scene a first listen to their newest tracks.

They’ve already released a few singles and if the rest of the album sounds like this we’re in for quite a ride. Check out the groovy, trumpet heavy Any Sound to see what I mean.

Nomadic Massive release their album at  Groove Nation, 410 Rachel East,  Thursday, June 2nd, 9:00pm (Doors at 8:00pm), $10.

Naive Melodie

This Saturday you can multitask by combining your dancing, your donating money to a good cause and your ‘trying to look cool by showing up at the same party where members of Arcade Fire are also partying all into one evening. That’s because Win Butler, Herve K, Regine Chassagne and D.L. Jones have combined forces to host a dance party at the Théâtre Fairmount in order to raise funds for kanpe.org an organization dedicated to helping rebuild Haiti.

The show promises performances by Windows 98 (the not so cryptic DJ name of Mr. Butler), LexisPierre KwendersRa Ra BandKassedo and Surprise Guests.

Wanting to crack the code of who the “surprise guest” could be I set off on an epic journey through the deep web to uncover the mystery. Turns out the first thing you get when you search this event on facebook is a post by organizer D.L. Jones promising that “Kid Koala will be leading a conga line with his portable turntable.”

Surprise guests or not, the scheduled performers should be enough to peak your interest. Keep an eye out for Pierre Kwenders, the Congolese-Canadian singer-rapper who performs in four different languages and seamlessly blends styles from all over the world into one yummy bowl of musical soup. Mmmmmmmm soup.


Windows 98, Lexis, Pierre Kwenders, Ra Ra Band, Kassedo and Surprise Guests play Théâtre Fairmount, 5240 Avenue du Parc,  Saturday, June 4th, 10:00pm (till 3:00am), $10 at the door or through the box office.

N.Y.C Punk Showcase

On a completely unrelated note, on Friday you can head over to Casa Del Popolo to check out the very accurately named N.Y.C Punk Showcase. A trio of New York’s finest punk bands (Mommy, Haram and Nandas) will be teaming up with two local acts (Gazm and Faze) to give you a whole lot of punk rock for only ten bucks!

I’ve now said punk three times in two sentences (make that 4-in-3, 5 if you count the title) in an attempt to drive home the very straightforward theme of this show. To further illustrate, here’s a song that’s less than a minute and a half long by this week’s “coolest band you’ve never heard of” Montreal’s own Gasm.

Mommy, Haram, Nandas, Gazm and Faze play Casa Del Popolo, 4873 Boulevard St-Laurent, Friday, June 3rd, 10:00pm (Doors at 9:00pm), $10. Tickets at the door or through lifttckt.

Cherry Chérie + Samuele

If you’re into rockabilly then on Saturday you can swing (pun somewhat intended) by Divan Orange where Cherry Chérie will be playing as part of an Indiemontreal / Fringefest showcase. The event will most certainly have a 50’s dance vibe so no sitting in the corner staring at your shoes!

Joining them on stage will be singer/songwriter Samuele whose blusey rock style will also transport you back in time a little and fit in nicely with the style of the evening.

Cherry Chérie and Samuele play Le Divan Orange, 4234 Boulevard St-Laurent, Saturday, June 4th, 9:30pm (Doors at 8:30pm), $10 at the Door or through Indiemontreal box office.

Know a band or an artist that should be featured in Shows This Week? Maybe a show FTB should cover, too? Let us know at music@forgetthebox.net. We can’t be everywhere and can’t write about everything, but we do our best!

a devils din

On tap this week, we check in with the boys from A Devil’s Din who are set to launch their second album, excessive use of the backslash occurs in describing Mykki Blanco, relief is offered to allergy sufferers and two songs are reviewed based on their drum fills. With all that promised how can you not read on!

A Devil’s Din Skylight Record Launch and Listening Party

If you’re looking for something to do tonight then look no further than O Patro Vys where local prog/psch rockers A Devil’s Din will be launching their second album Skylight in style with a listening party.

Along with a CD of the aforementioned album, if you show up you’ll get music (in the form of Light Bulb Alley’s own Jimmi Quinn spinning some tunes), art (in the form of Hyperdoodling), magic (could be a joke, not sure), and a vegan buffet (definitely not a joke, vegans never joke about a good buffet).

To wet your appetite FTB has secured the rights to the exclusive premier of the new track Phaze Ulysses and I must say if the rest of the album sounds like this, it’s in your interest to pick up a copy. Lovers of a good drum fill (something which is a lost art in modern pop music) will especially take note of this driving powerful tune.

A Devil’s Din release their album Skylight at O Patro Vys, 356 ave Mont-Royal East, Thursday, May 26th, 8:00pm, $10, 18+.

Courtney Barnett

On Sunday you can head over to the Metropolis and see Melbourne native and recent Grammy nominee, Courtney Barnett. After the success of her first full length album Sometimes I Sit and Think, and Sometimes I Just Sit the singer songwriter has been on quite a high and that has manifested itself into a North American tour.

Known for a deadpan delivery of lyrics that have a storytelling wit, Barnett has a way of capturing the listener and drawing them into the song with her. For any sufferer of allergies I suggest you check out the track Avant Gardener as it might become your personal anthem.

Courtney Barnett plays Metropolis, 59 Sainte-Catherine East, Sunday, May 29th, 8:00pm (Doors at 6:30), $29 ($32 at the doors), buy tickets through Metropolis box office.

Mykki Blanco + Doldrums + Gayance + River Lance

If you’re looking for a great dance/hip hop show (for a great price too!) you can go see Mykki Blanco at Théâtre Fairmount this Friday. The American rapper/writer/activist/performance artist/clearly very busy individual who is impossible to sum up in a sentence is on tour right now and not to be missed.

Joining Blanco on stage will be a trio of other performers, Doldrums, Gayance and River Lance making this a very full evening of music that will most likely inspire you to get up and dance. Actually, why wait till Friday, check out this new track from Doldrums and get up and dance now.

Mykki Blanco, Doldrums, Gayance and River Lance play Théâtre Fairmount, 5240 Avenue du Parc, Friday, May 27th, 9:00pm (Doors at 8:00), $20, buy tickets through Théâtre Fairmount box office or at the door, 18+.

Ought + Palm + Complications + The Submissives

If you want to get your indie rock on this week I suggest you head down to the Matahari Loft on Saturday where a (mostly) local collection of artists will be hitting the stage for a jam packed night of tunes. Back home after a brief but hectic US tour this month, this week’s “coolest band you should have heard of” Ought will be headlining the event.

Joining them will be the lone out of towers Palm and two more local acts Complications and The Submissives.  With the styles of these bands being difficult to classify and very different from one another this is by far the most eclectic show this week.

Actually you can hear a wide variety of styles in just one track by Palm. Yet again we find a tune dripping with sweet juicy drum fills which I know we all enjoy. Mmmmmmm drum fills….

Ought, Palm, Complications and The Submissives play Matahari Loft, 1673 Mount Royal East, Saturday, May 28th, 9:30pm (Doors at 9:00), $10, buy tickets through lfttckt.

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When you consider his internet celebrity and sizeable back catalog, Kaytranada’s debut LP 99.9% (XL Recordings) almost feels overdue. He’s been a household name on Soundcloud since his 2009 remix of Janet Jackson’s “If” and has continued to put out quality flips of songs both old and new since. His talent is undeniable, and his newest collection of songs is an opportunity to display it alongside a plethora of other artists.

In listening to 99.9%, some obvious influences float to the surface – its music is full of the synthetic jazz chords of the Neptunes and the drunken drums of J Dilla (former Dilla collaborator Kareem Riggins plays on “Bus Ride”). However, it never feels imitative. Kaytranada is one of many producers who can claim these artists as touchstones, but one of the few that can also lay claim to a distinctive sound. This distinctiveness is made all the more impressive given the diversity of samples and guests on 99.9%. You can safely bet that this will be the only album ever made with both Craig David and Little Dragon as featured artists, but Kaytranada’s production allows it to flow seamlessly. It’s a remarkably strong debut, and a timely release – tracks like “Glowed Up” and “Got it Good” are guaranteed to be rattling trunks all summer long.

The question Thursday night, however, was how well this new album would translate to a crowded venue. Kaytra rocks the club with his hip hop sets, and any remix of his is perfect driving or bedroom jamming material. But in the traditional DJ setup of screen, table, and pit, the rhythmic intricacies of 99.9% were at risk of getting lost on the moshing crowds.

Fortunately, while Kaytranada tracks may be more complex than the typical club fare, his set at Metropolis was evidence of their adaptability to a live setting. Kaytra modulated the energy of the sold out venue with ease, opening with some bangers like “Drive Me Crazy” that got the room bouncing. The set came in peaks and valleys; after a few high-energy tracks, Kaytra would slow the tempo with some mellow instrumentals that kept the crowd vibing. “Got it Good” and “One Too Many,” set against .gifs of pot leaves and waves crashing against the shoreline, went over especially well, lending a hazy, blissful atmosphere to the evening. Of course, just as the room was settling down, another high energy track, like his flip of Missy Elliott’s “Sock it to Me,” would bring the energy back up again.

The two-hour set closed with an extended play of Kaytra’s now-classic take on Janet Jackson’s “If,” picking up the crowd and setting it back down one last time. After a quick encore consisting of album cuts and a new Chance the Rapper song, he departed to rabid applause. If there was any doubt about Kaytranada’s appeal to a larger audience, it was unwarranted – it is now abundantly clear that he’s ready for the big time, and thankfully, he’s taken his idiosyncrasies with him.

Featured image by Ralph Haddad.

Candye Kane

The world has lost a true unbridled talent. Candye Kane was literally The Toughest Girl Alive!

Anyone who had the pleasure of knowing Candye knew she was a lovely and genuine spirit. She was an amazing friend, mother, performer, and mentor. She spent her life running uphill in heels, there were topsy turvy tribulations, but she never succumb to the hard times.

Candye used her artistic talent and voice to fight for sex workers rights, to end violence against women, was part of the body and sex positive movements, and co-founded United by Music, an organization that mentored developmentally disabled musicians. She was also openly bisexual and championed LGBTQ rights and headlined many pride events worldwide.

In her over thirty year career, she traveled the world spreading love positive energy. Candye played between 200 -250 shows annually despite battling cancer. She is a Super Hero!

Candye_KaneUpon her death she knew her popularity would again rise. We must remember her for the real talented activist that she was and celebrate her spectacular sunshine through the screen of sensationalized lies.

It is important to know her as more than just a sex object. Even years later gross dudes would recognize her tattoos and say lewd things to her. Have some respect!

Yes, Candye was a pinup model, she did play the piano with her breasts, and she was in pornographic magazines. She tucked away that part of her life and did not let it define her. She found success through hard work and touring.

She had a brain under all of that beauty and the voice of a true diva. Her music was her soul. She sang original songs about accepting your body and celebrating your social status.

She wanted to bring light to the women who came before her, some of which were forgotten in the male dominated industry. Big Maybelle, Big Mama Thorten, Bessie Smith, and Etta James were her main inspirations. Performers like Devil Doll, Imelda May, and The Horrorpops have a lot in common with the retro-inspired Rockabilly vibes that Candye personified during her tumultuous career.

Candye piano

Adversity causes the most profound art. Candye started life with her abusive mother, who taught her to shoplift. Then she became a mormon, only to be kicked out when she became pregnant at 17.

She then moved on to punk music, living with a Mexican Cholo gang, and adult entertainment. Her voluptuous body evolved and left her vulnerable. She used the short stint in the adult industry to support herself and her child. She did like to party, but was always a classy dame.

Candye’s son Evan was her drummer for many worldwide tours. Her son Tommy is also a musician. Evan and Laura Chavez performed with Candye in the play that was written about her called The Toughest Girl Alive (after Candye’s song Toughest Girl Alive from the album of the same name).

She raised her kids in San Diego and it was very important for her to be an effective parent. She was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer but still kept on trucking. Her best friend and collaborator was Laura Chavez. They met while wearing the same shirt and eventually became artistic soul mates who toured constantly.

Laura was Candye’s best friend, amazing guitarist, co-song writer, and producer. She lived at the hospital and was by Candye’s side though out her many stints in many hospitals in the US and around the world. Laura was even there by her side when Candye passed away.

candye and laura

Candye’s physique changed as she got sick. The cancer took away her curves but did not eat away at her raw loveliness. She always embraced her big beautiful body and was actually self conscious during the transition.

Candye briefly studied to be an opera singer. She loved classic standards and punkabilly music equally. Her close friend, Marika remembered a beautiful moment where Candye was singing Dream a Little Dream and Honeysuckle Rose while getting ready for a show.

Candye is a true inspiration, she never gave up, performed through sickness, and probably would have been happiest if she had died on stage. I was always amazed that even through her pain and hard times she still held her head up high and wanted to march on to the next town. She shared herself with the world in such a way that her legend will live on forever in the hearts and future artistic performances of all who knew who she was.

CandyeKaneDollBoobsI was lucky to open for her in 2013 with my burlesque troupe, The Stripteasers, at Nietzsches in Buffalo NY. She completely blew me away with her powerful attitude and unwavering positivity.

Candye loved playing in Buffalo, Rochester, and Canada. I knew that she was part of the reason I was where I was. I was honored to share a stage with her.

As a plus size girl I look to Candye for guidance. She was a BBW pinup model when it was hard to do it. She transcended size and was more than just a fetish. She was a true super hero.

I loved her flawless sense of style, especially the ridiculously amazing dress with doll faced boobs. You know you are doing well when you are spoofed by drag queens.

She was classic, original, and absolutely timeless. I especially relate to songds like 200 Pounds of Fun, You Need a Great Big Woman to Show You How to Love and Fit Fat and Fine. They fight size discrimination and make me feel good about my soft and squishy delicious body.

Candye Kane shall sparkle in the collective memory of us all, she will live on in the hearts of her fans, friends, and all of the women she inspired to be themselves and take pride in their beautiful bodies. Award winning Delta Blues diva punkabilly swing superstar feminist icon super hero, you are now singing with the angels.

You inspired a generation of women to not give up, you didn’t allow yourself to be discredited or shot down, you rose up and showed the world that there was no room for self doubt. Thank you Miss Candye Kane, the world will not be the same without you.

FTB

In this week’s installment I’ll be giving you three options to kick off your weekend. So tell your roommate you’ll be using the dancing shoes on Friday, they can have the pj’s. All are reasonably priced, have Montreal based talent involved and want you to be friends with them. Well maybe not the last one.

Pif Paf Hangover – Lost Cousins

Head over to the Divan Orange Friday night and you’ll get a good dose of electro pop courtesy of Pif Paf Hangover. The Montreal based duo composed of Max O Finn and Emmanuel C Boucher are currently working on their second album which should be out sometime in 2016.

If you’re curious about the new music you should know they’ve promised to play some of the new stuff on Friday. Here’s a teaser:

They’ll be joined by Kingston based indie rockers Lost Cousins who win this week’s prize for coolest band you’ve probably never hear of. We can fix that real quick though, just click play… just click play… doooooo it… (seriously though, this is a pretty great video for a very catchy track).

Pif Paf Hangover with Lost Cousins perform at Divan Orange, 4234 Boulevard Saint-Laurent, Friday, April 29, doors 8:30pm, show 9:30pm, $10 in advance, $12 at the door, 18+. Buy tickets through Indiemontreal.

Citylake – Let Us Out – The van Arks

On Friday you can also head over to Atomic Cafe and check out Citylake, Let Us Out and The van Arks. This trio of local bands promises to give an energetic and inspired night full of new and sometimes improvised music. Here are some recent live tracks the bands have posted in anticipation of the show.

 

If you want to know more you’re in luck since FTB recently sat down with Citylake frontman Martin Saint for an exclusive interview.

Citylake, Let Us Out and The van Arks perform at Atomic Cafe,
3606 Ontario East, Friday, April 29th, doors 9pm, show 9:30pm, $5. Tickets at the door.

Finger Eleven with Special Guests: Polista and Men & Company

The big rock show of the night is certainly taking place over at the Théâtre Fairmount where Finger Eleven will be performing a mix of new material and classic hits. The band, formerly known under the best 90’s band name ever the Rainbow Butt Monkeys, have been doing this for a long time now and certainly won’t fail to impress.

Just as exciting is that they’ve asked two local acts, Polista and Men & Company to support them. Lovers of the big guitar sound take note, this is the show for you.

Finger Eleven with special guests Polista and Men & Company play Théâtre Fairmount, Friday, April 29th, doors 8:00pm, show 9:00pm, $20. Tickets available through Théâtre Fairmount box office.

Featured image: Lost Cousins via Instagram

Know a band or an artist that should be featured in Shows This Week? Maybe a show FTB should cover, too? Let us know at music@forgetthebox.net. We can’t be everywhere and can’t write about everything, but we do our best!

2-Young Fathers Montreal (6)

Before beginning their final track of the evening, Shame, Young Fathers’ vocalist G Hastings takes centre stage; for a fleeting moment, it feels like I’ve left the concert hall and entered some kind of mystical protest site—part political and part spiritual.

7-Young Fathers Montreal (8)

With an austere look cast across his face, Hastings delivers the statement: “We are all refugees.” And without allowing much time for those words to fully resonate, the band leaps into a passionate and kinetic final song, the line “Shame on you,” repeating over and over.

In a Young Fathers show, there is a looming sense of heaviness, of burden, of trouble in the world; their regulated hip hop beats and smooth r&b vocal harmonies seem to be constantly under threat of being drowned out by discordant noise.

8-Young Fathers Montreal (4)Implicitly speaking to the world community’s failure to properly address the Syrian Refugee Crisis, Young Fathers place the blame and the “shame” not just upon political leaders, but also upon themselves and upon their audience, too — fun stuff for a casual Thursday night show. But it wasn’t all doom-and-gloom. As much as Young Fathers touch on elements of darkness and despair in their performance, the concert felt like a kind of catharsis, it seemed to channel a clear sense of hope.

Indeed, a Young Fathers show is a multi-leveled, one-of-a-kind spectacle, and a ton of fun, too. I spent most of my time during the 1 hour and 15 minute set dancing, feeding off of the indescribable levels of energy put forth by the band—in particular, the wildly erratic jerks and gyrations of Kayus Bankole and the powerful drum patterns of Steven Morrison, who uses his full body to keep time. The performance was incredibly physical, and the band’s eagerness to move and explore the space onstage had me moving, too (even though my moves were more of the Dad-variety).

When the lights finally went up at the end of the set, I felt as though I was being beamed back down to Earth. For a few minutes, I gazed dreamily around the room, regaining my bearings, incoherently clapping and mumbling “One more song!”

I left the Fairmount on Thursday night feeling as though I had been a part of something spiritual, something important—even though I can’t really articulate what that was.

* photos by Georgia Vatcher

jesse stone-1

Forget The Box is proud to present the new video for Montreal troubadour Jesse Stone’s Whiskey Song.

Since leaving for New York Jesse Stone has played many clubs where the whiskey runs, but it’s nice to see that he still cares about his hometown as he releases another video performance from Montreal.

Whiskey Songs is a live performance video mostly using footage from the 2014 record launch at Sala Rossa (my review of the show).

Since Whiskey Song was not included in his last album, Break of Day which had an incredible list of songs. Could this possibly mean that a new album might be on it’s way? Only time will tell.

You get the Troubadour style of his live performance which really kind of articulates how well he performs live.

If you have seen Jesse Stone videos before, then you know that they’re usually rough cuts of shots. They document what it is like to be at one of Stone’s live shows, which I have always thought to be his strong suit.

Check out Whiskey Song:

the holds say youll be mine video

Montreal band The Holds have already succeeded in bringing the blues to this city’s indie rock scene. Now, following the success of their self-titled EP launch at O Patro Vys, they are set to play Turbo Haus in St-Henri this Saturday, March 12th, but not before releasing a second music video.

While their first video for the song Can’t Go Back featured members of the band in a warehouse setting, their latest foray into the world of music video leaves the band on the audio track playing the song Say You’ll Be Mine. Meanwhile director Helene Ha chooses to focus the visuals on ballerina Anna Sementchouk performing in the middle of a deserted street, or maybe two deserted streets.

While the background is unmistakably Montreal throughout, I’m pretty sure that the first part takes place on the northern edge of McGill Campus while the second part was undeniably shot near the Jacques Cartier Bridge.

Regardless of whether I guessed right about the first part or not, the choice to shoot at night, the dark aesthetic and the way Sementchouk’s dancing mixes with The Holds’ music creates a very enticing tableau. Check it out yourself:

And check out The Holds with openers The Empty Yellers this Saturday at Turbo Haus, 5011 Notre Dame Ouest, 9:30pm, only six bucks!

Sheepdogs Corona Theatre Montreal

Last Friday evening at the Corona Theatre looked like a scene straight out of Cameron Crowe’s acclaimed rock n’ roll drama Almost Famous. The venue was packed to the brim with rowdy, power-chord-hungry teenagers sporting long, greasy hair and leather Iron Maiden jackets. And if I had a nickel for every time that I saw someone toss up the rock sign (otherwise known as the sign of the horns) during one of The Sheepdogs’ ultra-classic sounding guitar solos, I’d probably have enough nickels to fund the construction of a time machine to send all of those kids back to the generation that they clearly missed out on (or at least think they missed out on).

Now while I don’t want to sound overly skeptical of the crowd’s enthusiasm and excitement– the energy was palpable at the Corona– I do wish to express that my first official Sheepdogs experience was pretty surreal. A total blast from the past, you might say.

Sheepdogs Corona Theatre Montreal 2While the teens (and pre-teens) were busy shredding gnarly air-guitar and starting short-lived mosh-pits, the other demographic of the crowd, composed of 40-year old Dads and their spouses, were quietly bobbing their balding heads, and shuffling about in Asics running shoes, probably reminiscing on a time when rock music was more culturally cutting edge, and less obscured with piles of layered-on nostalgia.

That’s not to say that The Sheepdogs’ sound can simply be reduced to mere genre re-hash— serving merely to fill the cultural void which emerged in the mid-90s, after hippie revivalism and guitar-based rock moved deeper and deeper underground. Indeed, while some of the younger fans at the Corona were blatantly appropriating a style and a culture that they knew relatively little about, the band onstage that night is an important Canadian cultural emblem, carrying the sonic torch of seminal rock bands like The Guess Who and Bachman Turner Overdrive into the 21st-Century. The Sheepdogs’ tendency to evoke nostalgia doesn’t feel like a cheap gimmick; instead, their performances remind us that we need more bands like these guys to keep the ethos of rock music alive.

The show on Friday night harkened back to the glory days of classic rock; the 2-part guitar harmonies (a technique the band likes to call “guitarmonies”) on the fan-favourite Southern Dreaming recalls both the deep-south rock stylings of the Allman Brothers, and also the blistering double-guitar lead on The Guess Who’s Share The Land.

As the night progressed, The Sheepdogs worked through a setlist composed of new material from their aptly titled 2015 release Future Nostalgia, as well as a host of hit songs from their critically praised debut and sophomore records.

The Sheepdogs closed their initial set with arguably their most well-known and recognizable track, I Don’t Know before returning for an encore that featured a 12-minute rendition of Neil Young’s classic Down By The River. Not only was it an epic way of closing out a nostalgia-laden evening, the choice of song seemed to be a deliberate gesture to the band’s roots– the days when drinking beers and jamming along with Neil Young records in someone’s basement took precedence over rehearsing polished live performances.

Sheepdogs Corona Theatre Montreal 3

It’s hard to imagine that The Sheepdogs were teetering on the brink of musical oblivion just six years ago. After years of relentless touring across Canada, and countless nightmare “touring adventures,” the band was severely in debt and on the verge of giving up. That was, until a Canadian record producer silently submitted the band’s name to be considered for the 2011 Rolling Stone Cover Contest. The rest, of course, is classic-rock-revival history. The Sheepdogs went on to win the contest, and in doing so, became the first unsigned band in history to appear on the front cover of Rolling Stone.

The Sheepdogs’ performance last Friday at the Corona was the band’s first show in Canada after an extensive European tour. Although the Saskatoon natives were still thousands of kilometres from their true stomping grounds, they were nevertheless “thrilled to be back home,” according to lead vocalist and band frontman Ewan Currie. Their 2016 Canadian tour, which will bring them westward all the way to Vancouver before returning back east, will naturally be remarkably different than those brutal treks across Canada a less than a decade ago.

The band has rightly earned a special place in the hearts and minds of a Canadian classic rock fan base that still craves those sweet, southern-influenced guitar hooks and delicate three-part vocal harmonies. Friday night’s performance reminded me that The Sheepdogs were able to pull through in the end, turning their Cameron Crow-esque pipe dream into reality. Finally, it seems, The Sheepdogs have made it.

* photos by Georgia Vatcher

cakes

Raw and carefree is how we can describe the sound bestowed upon us by Cakes Da Killa. With the release of Hunger Pang in June 2014 (and even with his first releases in 2011), this young Jersey rapper has provided some with more than they would have bargained for or even can handle.

Most importantly, he has given some of us a voice and sound within the rap genre. Vulgar? Cakes Da Killa is only being himself, raw, honest, hard, providing music for LGBT people of color looking for relatable music and homophobes something to choke on.

He has gained a lot of attention over the past few years, making the rounds on blogs and known radio shows and receiving more than honorable mentions from MTV and more. With all this success, don’t expect him to change who he is. The music is still raw and the content is still Queer.

But this does not mean that he wants to be set apart from the rest of the players. Giving us impeccable delivery and spitting scripture within his lyrics, he could go neck to neck with any.

As for his beats, he takes us beyond high hats and basic basslines. A heavy mix of electronic sounds merge more than they clash.

Cakes Da Killa is coming back to us with more of his goodie goodies (with WASIU ft. Dear Lola & KD II Times and Visuals by Jason Voltaire) this Saturday, November 28, 8pm @ Phi Centre, tickets available on the Phi Centre website

lakes-of-canada

Montreal’s own orchestral gospel-inspired folk-rock band Lakes of Canada are releasing a new album. It’s called Transgressions and according to the band’s website, it’s inspired by Margaret Atwood’s The Handmaid’s Tale. If that doesn’t already grab your attention and make you want to grab a copy, give a listen to the single Eden:

They’re launching the album on October 16th. Forget the Box in partnership with Indie Montreal are giving you a chance to win tickets to the launch and grab yourself a free copy of the album, too. It’s quite simple, really. All you have to do is share this post on Facebook or Tweet it along with your favourite Lakes of Canada song. Make sure to tag @forgetthebox and @indiemontreal so we actually see your entry.

We’ll put all the entries (one per person) into a hat, or a cup, or whatever’s around, and draw a winner, who will be announced on Tuesday, October 13th. The contest is not open to FTB contributors, editors and promo people as well as those who work for Indie Montreal, but if you are part of one of those groups, please don’t hesitate to share anyways!

Also, we’ll be posting a review of the album and an audio interview with the band in the next little while, so be on the lookout for that, too!

Best of luck!